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Quick tip: taking videos of a computer monitor

*** I hope others will add comments here.
The goal: to take videos of some partly inaccessible software to send to its developer. The videos would need to be quick clips that only show the problem; not long-winded amateur off-the-cuff recordings that would bore the developer.
The problem: blind with just light perception and no experience of being sighted before. No idea how to do this.
The solution: First, practice with the software, making audio recordings for your own use if you need to keep track of the steps you took. Get to where you can demonstrate the problem in under 90 seconds. For example “on this screen labeled enter customer data, I can tab to the first and last name fields fine, but there’s no way to get to the address or phone number field with the keyboard”.

Second: now you got your spiel down, get yourself a cheap tripod for the phone. There are big ones that are four or five feet tall, but a little one which securely sits on your desk can be had for around $10 U.S. If you need to make it work better, (my monitor is on a stand) you can always stand the mini-tripod on a stack of books.

Third: if your software has a high-contrast mode turn that on. The iPHONE wants to autofocus on the brightest objects. Be sure to maximize the window you are working in so it fills the entire screen.

Fourth: Position the tripod where you think you need it. Remember the camera is on the upper right corner of the phone. So it faces the center of the computer monitor while the phone faces you. Most modern monitors are in landscape mode, where the aspect ratio is 9:16, whereas older monitors are portrait, 4:3. Read about aspect ratio here:
http://ift.tt/1LACkdy(image)

Now you think your camera is correctly oriented, pull up any screen loaded with text that your screen reader can read just fine. Then run some OCR apps. I like the free Seeing AI or the KNFB reader for their field of view reports. Once they can detect the edges of the screen and correctly OCR all the text, you know the camera is seeing your computer monitor fine. You will have to move the phone back and forth, up and down and possibly tilt the monitor. Do this in a dark room with the screen brightness high. Remember to turn the screen curtain off or the camera doesn’t work correctly on the phone. I found my iPHONE needed to be about a meter or yard away from the monitor. If you can’t get this part to work, you’ll need a sighted person to help. I was able to get reasonable videos with no sighted help; better ones when help was available.

Fifth: using painters tape or anything which won’t leave a stain or sticky residue, mark the place on your desk where the tripod and/or the monitor must be position for proper viewing. Now make some practice videos of screens you can easily access with your screen reader. Adjust the volume of your speakers until the video sounds good, because of course you want the developer to hear what your screen reader does and does not see. You might need to practice until your voice and the screen reader are at the same volume.

Sixth: share the videos with sighted friends. Respond to their feedback. Can they hear the screen reader OK? Do you need to slow it down or change to a higher-quality voice? Do they see the dialog box clearly or is part of the screen cut off? For example, if the screen seems fuzzy you can experiment with turning off auto-focus and ae exposure. This video:
http://ift.tt/2tXLH6O;…

is particularly clear about how all the hidden camera features work.
One tip, if you need to force focus on a particular part of the screen, double-tap there. If you can’t see where to do this in the viewfinder, simply experiment and run your resulting photos through an OCR program like KNFB reader or Seeing AI to find out if they still read OK. To lock the focus so that movement won’t trigger the auto-focus, double-tap and hold. These are of course both gestures for voiceover, and not for the sighted user who only needs to single tap or single-tap and hold.

Seventh: Hook up your headphones so you can push the volume button to start the recording. You can double-tap the “take video” button of course but that may shift the iPHONE’s position a bit. Better to do it remotely.

Eighth: Now that sightlings say your video is acceptable, run through your spiel with the inaccessible parts of your software. Make several videos and talk during all parts letting your screen reader read what it can.

Ninth: OK, time to edit. In the photos app, choose your video, choose edit and adjust the scrubbers to cut out the parts you don’t want.
There is a great podcast here on trimming videos, and also simply exploring the camera app will help you learn the ins and outs of video recording. Remember with stable objects like a computer monitor, your results can be as good or better than those of sighted people.

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Cyclepath

Category: 

Description of App: 

In this game you’re riding on a motorcycle and your goal is to avoid other cars while jumping on ramps to pick up coins which can be used to unlock faster bikes and more varied locations to drive in. The game features Binaural audio (like PapaSangre) as well as environmental effects.

Version: 

0.1

Free or Paid: 

Free

Version Of OS X App Was Tested On: 

10.12.6

Accessibility Comments: 

Sometimes you may need to turn VoiceOver off and back on to get speech to work. Alternatively, as with Dark Defender, you can switch to “web TTS” from the options menu.

Usability: 

The app is fully accessible with VoiceOver and is easy to navigate and use.

Other Comments: 

You can either download the game as an application, or play it on-line (which works in any browser, tested using Chrome and Safari.

Developer's Twitter Username: 

@dragon1424

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BGZ – July 23 2017

This podcast was submitted by Rick. You can contact this contributor via their email at rharmon@blind-geek-zone.net.

Just wanted to say hello to everyone and give a quick update on what I’ve been up to over the last many months since I’ve been on here.

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Unboxing and Installation of Alpatronix BX170 iPhone 7 Battery case

This podcast was submitted by Armando Maldonado. You can contact this contributor via their email at armando.maldonado0767@gmail.com.

in this short podcast, I unbox an iPhone Screen protector I purchased for my iPhone 7, along with the Alpatronix BX170 battery case. I then try to demonstrate how to install the case on the phone, and show you some of the challenges I faced. Both the LoveIt Tempered glass protector and the Alpatronix BX170 case can be purchased through Amazon.

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Reizon talking etomic watch

This podcast was submitted by raymon lombardi. You can contact this contributor via their email at ray214@gmail.com.

I go over the options of the reizon talkin etomic watch and describe where everything such as the buttons and satellite sthing is located on the watch

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Seeing A I app

This podcast was submitted by Matt. You can contact this contributor via their email at matt.from.florida@gmail.com.

This is a quick demo of the seeing A I app by Microsoft and my thoughts on it. As well as some links.

http://ift.tt/2u8vcUR

You can reach me at: matt.from.florida@gmail.com
If you all have questions or just want to talk.

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my vacuum cleaner collection part 4

This podcast was submitted by Mike Arrigo. You can contact this contributor via their email at n0oxy@charter.net.

Here is my fourth pod cast of vacuums I have added to my collection, there are 10 vacuums in this pod cast, including some really old ones made in the 1940’s and 1960’s.

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Voice Cam – for Blind and Visually Impaired is currently free for a limited time

Hi to All,
Voice Cam, the app for Blind and visually impaired is free for a limited time!
More details at http://ift.tt/2j5a1Ov
Gian Piero

Deal Type: 

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Transmit

Category: 

Description of App: 

The gold standard of macOS file transfer apps just drove into the future. Transmit 5 is here. Upload, download, and manage files on tons of servers with an easy, familiar, and powerful UI. It’s quite good. Transmit now connects to 10 new cloud services , like Backblaze B2, Box, Google Drive, DreamObjects, Dropbox, Microsoft Azure, and Rackspace Cloud Files. as well as the standard FTP, SFTP, and S#.

Version: 

5.0

Free or Paid: 

Paid

Version Of OS X App Was Tested On: 

10.12

Accessibility Comments: 

Fully accessible.

Usability: 

The app is fully accessible with VoiceOver and is easy to navigate and use.

Other Comments: 

Panic developers went the extra mile and did an incredible job of making an accessible app even more accessible. You will always know which files are local and which are remote. A lot of effort went into making Transmit even more accessible and it truly shows.

Developer's Twitter Username: 

@panic

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Want to Know Which Apps You have that will Not work with iOS 11? Here’s how to find out.

With iOS 11 abandoning all support for 32 bit devices and apps, people may be wondering what apps will and will not be supported. The official Apple article linked to above states: “As a reminder, new iOS apps and updates submitted to the App Store must support 64-bit. Support for 32-bit apps is not available in iOS 11 and all 32-bit apps previously installed on a user’s device will not launch.”
To that end, here’s a quick way to determine what apps you have on your device that you will have to leave behind along with iOS 10 itself. This information is available with iOS 10.3 and later.

  1. Go to Settings.

  2. Go to General.

  3. Double Tap the About button.

  4. Scrol down/flick to the Applications button and double tap it.

  5. At the top of this page will be a heading called “compatibility” followed by a list of apps which contain a 64-bit update, and below that, a list of those apps you may have to let go if the developer doesn’t update them.

At this time, there are a total of 22 apps on my phone which do not have 64-bit support. If you have apps in this category which you hope to be able to use with iOS 11, I highly encourage you to contact the developer of those apps.

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